Topics

Nutrition

Colonial Traders and Native Americans

Native Immunity

I have long believed that native peoples—in the Americas, in Africa and in the South Seas—began to suffer from infectious disease as soon as they came in contact with European colonists. In fact, many have asked me how such healthy people could succumb to disease so quickly.
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/ Nutrition
Vitamin supplements

Supplements: A Better Way

In my last post, I discussed Dr. Roizen’s recommended supplement plan, noting the drawbacks of each product. The discussion provides a natural segue into a look at the subject of vitamin products in general.
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/ Nutrition
Vitamins & Supplements

Dr. Roizen’s Vitamin Plan

In my last post, I discussed the dietary suggestions of Dr. Mike Roizen, chief wellness officer at the Cleveland Clinic. The doctor admits that even though he was eating a “good” diet, full of colorful fruits and vegetables, he still found that he was missing a lot of vitamins and minerals.
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/ Nutrition
Dr. Roizen Diet

Dr. Roizen Gets It Wrong

Dr. Mike Roizen is the chief wellness officer at the “famous Cleveland Clinic,” where the rich and famous get examined and treated. He is the author of You: The Owner's Manual: An Insider's Guide To The Body that Will Make You Healthier and Younger, among other books, and over two hundred peer-reviewed scientific articles. He also served on FDA advisory committees for sixteen years.
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/ Nutrition

Building Natural Immunity

Many wise parents have made the decision not to vaccinate their children. They know that vaccines are full of toxins that can cause many serious side effects. It is also becoming apparent that vaccines don’t even work, and worse, can actually spread disease.
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/ Nutrition

Cooking The Whole Fish

My mother and I both loved Paris and several times had the pleasure of being there together—either meeting there or traveling there. However we met up, we never let the opportunity go by without a visit to our favorite restaurant, La Boule D’Or, in the 7th arrondisement.
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/ Nutrition

Wise Traditions 2017

The 18th annual Wise Traditions conference of the Weston A. Price Foundation is coming up next month, November 10-13 in Minneapolis Minnesota. If you are looking to learn a lot in the company of a community of like-minded individuals, this is the place to be.
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/ Nutrition

Pancake Batter

One of the most versatile and successful recipes from Nourishing Traditions is the pancakes. Freshly ground flour (spelt, emmer or soft winter wheat) soaked overnight with equal parts of yogurt or kefir serves as the base for delicious, light tasting and highly digestible pancakes.
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/ Nutrition, Traditional Foods

Gizzards, The Gateway Organ Meat

Have you ever wondered how animals without teeth chew up their food, especially hard foods like grains? They actually have an internal grinding apparatus, called the gizzard.
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/ Nutrition

Milk and Water Kefir

Kefir grains are a wonderful way to culture raw milk because they are not temperature sensitive—for yogurt and other cultures, the milk needs to be heated and kept warm for the culture to work.
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/ Nutrition

Traditional Foods

Food in Switzerland

Earlier this year I made a trip to Switzerland to give two talks on raw milk and to visit one of my boys, who lives in Geneva. Of course, the food in Switzerland received my special attention.
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/ Traditional Foods

Pancake Batter

One of the most versatile and successful recipes from Nourishing Traditions is the pancakes. Freshly ground flour (spelt, emmer or soft winter wheat) soaked overnight with equal parts of yogurt or kefir serves as the base for delicious, light tasting and highly digestible pancakes.
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/ Nutrition, Traditional Foods
Nuts

True Blue Zones: Loma Linda

So far we have looked at four “blue zones,” regions that have lots of long-lived people: Sardinia, Okinawa, Costa Rica and Ikaria. What have we learned so far about the characteristics of these nonagenarians? Maybe the most important thing is to live in a place that ends with the letter A. Just kidding.
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/ Traditional Foods
Ikaria Lamb Shanks

True Blue Zones: Ikaria, Greece

Tourism in the Greek island of Ikaria got a big boost when scientists determined that Ikaria was a blue zone—an area with a large number of long-lived inhabitants
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/ Traditional Foods
Cattle in Costa Rica

True Blue Zones: Costa Rica

The Nicoya Peninsula is a fertile rectangle of land on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Since the arrival of the Spaniards, the region has hosted herds of beef and dairy cattle. Many tropical fruits thrive there, including citrus, mango and papaya.
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/ Traditional Foods
SPAM

True Blue Zones: Okinawa

In my last blog, we began a discussion of blue zones—regions with a lot of centenarians—as popularized by Dan Buettner in his book The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who’ve Lived the Longest. As we saw in his chapter on the Sardinian blue zone, he leaves out considerable information that contradicts his premise, namely that the longevity diet is one that contains a lot of vegetables and only small amounts of meat—that’s lean meat, not “processed meats that are filled with fat.”
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/ Traditional Foods
Sardinian Elder

True Blue Zones: Sardinia

Often when I present information on the work of Weston Price, I get feedback that goes like this: native peoples on their native diets, high in animal foods and animal fat, may have been attractive and healthy when they were young, but they did not live into old age. If you want to live a long life, you need to eat a diet that is low in fat, low in salt, high in plant foods and rich in dietary fiber, in short, the penalty for a long life is adherence to the sad and unsatisfying diet foisted on us by the Diet Dictocrats.
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/ Traditional Foods

Update on Bone Broth

"Broth is the new juice," is the saying on the street. Indeed, interest in genuine bone broth is taking off, thanks not only to my book Nourishing Broth, but also to several other great books on the subject. And the number of artisan companies making broth is growing, as a quick look at the Weston A. Price Foundation Shopping Guide will show.
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Nourishing Fats: Why We Need Animal Fats For Health And Happiness

I’m happy to report that my new book, Nourishing Fats, will be out this coming January (2017). The book began as a few notes and a hasty table of contents jotted down over a dozen years ago, after many conversations with my mentor, Mary G. Enig, PhD. We agreed on the need for a popular book addressing the subject of saturated fats, one that would do more than acknowledge the notion that they “might not be so bad,” but explain why they are essential to life. Needless to say, the inspiration for this book, and the basic knowledge on fats and oils, came from her. Nourishing Fats is dedicated to the memory of this courageous biochemist, who sacrificed research grants and a prestigious career in order to warn the public about the dangers of trans fats.
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Kombucha Like Fine Champagne

Kombucha is an artisan product, and like all hand-crafted foods, the best results require patience and time. A good hand-brewed kombucha is like a fine champagne, fizzy with tiny bubbles, a delightful combination of sweet and sour, and even slightly viscous on the tongue.
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/ Traditional Foods

The Displacing Foods of Modern Commerce

Friends don't let friends eat the Impossible Burger

Impossible Burger—Soy Disgusting

A final fake meat product to hit the shelves recently is the Impossible Burger, made from genetically modified soy protein concentrate. Impossible Foods CEO and founder Pat Brown makes his commitment to GM soy and his long-term agenda clear in a recent press release:
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Burgers

Big Yawn Burgers

Recently I wrote about lab meat, a product that uses bovine fetal serum (BFS)--blood extracted from living fetal calves--to feed meat protein molecules grown in a laboratory. Now let’s turn our attention to two other imitation meat products new to the market, which the press has heralded as breakthroughs in fake meat: the Beyond Burger and the Impossible Burger. Will these new products overcome the observation that veggie burgers are “tasteless pucks?”
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EAT-Lancet Meets Rev. Malthus

The rhetoric for plant-based diets has ratcheted up to a shrill pitch in the EAT-Lancet report, released with much fanfare a couple of weeks ago. The document is the result of “more than two years of collaboration between thirty-seven ‘experts’ from sixteen countries,” lots of frowny faces telling us that we need to eat lentils because the earth is getting warmer and we are running out of everything.
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Lab Meat: Big Hype, Bad Investment

Laboratory-produced meat or lab meat—sometimes called “cultured meat” or even “clean meat”--is in the news these days, with gushing articles in the Washington Post, the New York Times and many magazines. The publicity machines are whirring at high speed, and all the chic arguments are on display. “Save the planet bite by bite,” is one of the slogans. If we eat lab meat instead of real meat, we’ll save the land from the desecration by cattle, cut down on water use, protect the air from cow farts containing methane and forestall global warming. Lab meat would be kinder also, because no animals would be killed.
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Diet For A Large Planet

Recently I participated in the 2018 Long Island Food Conference, the lone meat eater in a lineup of speakers espousing “plant-based” diets. The keynote speaker was Francis Moore Lappé, whom you will recognize as the author of the very influential Diet for a Small Planet, the 1971 book that convinced many to embrace a diet of grains and beans.
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Flavored Milks: How Low Can You Go?

Flavored milks are highly sweetened beverages made with powdered skim milk—they are actually the dairy industry’s way of getting rid of all the skim milk left over from the production of butter and cream, mostly for ice cream. Since Americans are huge ice cream eaters (and since Americans are eating more butter these days), there’s an enormous amount of this waste product that the industry needs to get rid of.
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The 2018 Global Food Forum

Recently I attended the 2018 Global Food Forum, organized by the Wall Street Journal, held in the Intercontinental Hotel in New York, and sponsored by Pratt Industries (maker of recyclable packaging), the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, US Soy and The Australian (news coverage).
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MSG and Free Glutamate: Lurking Everywhere

A few weeks ago, on a trip to British Columbia, I ate in a local restaurant. When eating out, I always try to order something simple, without a gravy or sauce, since these sauces are bound to contain MSG. So I ordered a plain crab cake with rice and vegetables—no sauce, no mayo. Boy, did that crab cake taste good! About midnight I knew why. I woke up with a dry mouth, a terrible thirst and a headache. The next day I felt sore all over, like I’d been in a fight. My hands felt like they had arthritis.
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Nutella Riots

Most Americans have never heard of Nutella even though world wide it is one of the most popular processed foods, with sales of eleven million jars annually in one hundred sixty countries. An article in the Washington Post (January 27, 2018) describes riots at the French Intermarche supermarket chain when the retailer slashed the price of a 35-ounce jar by 70 percent.
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All Those New Oils

I often get questions about all these new—even new-fangled—oils like grape seed oil, rice bran oil, hemp seed oil and argan oil. Other oils new to the scene include avocado oil and camelina oil. Do they have any health benefits, and should we use them in cooking and food preparation?
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A Campaign for Real Milk

Flavored Milks: How Low Can You Go?

Flavored milks are highly sweetened beverages made with powdered skim milk—they are actually the dairy industry’s way of getting rid of all the skim milk left over from the production of butter and cream, mostly for ice cream. Since Americans are huge ice cream eaters (and since Americans are eating more butter these days), there’s an enormous amount of this waste product that the industry needs to get rid of.
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What Pasteurization Does To The Vitamins In Milk

“Pasteurization of milk ensures safety for human consumption by reducing the number of viable pathogenic bacteria.” So begins an article published in the Journal of Food Protection, published in 2011.
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/ A Campaign for Real Milk

Milk Prices and the Decline of Rural Life

Friday April 1 was my husband’s ninetieth birthday, and among the many cards he received was one from our insurance agent, "In the year you were born. . ., " containing a chart of prices now and then.
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/ A Campaign for Real Milk

Flora and Fauna

Radionics on the Farm: Too Woo-Woo for You?

Farmers have a lot of things to keep them awake at night, and one of the things that made me lose sleep since we started farming in 2011 was chicken predation.
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/ Flora and Fauna

How Do Animals Feel About Being Killed for Meat?

One of the arguments for vegetarianism holds that killing animals for meat is just like killing human beings—that killing animals is "murder of the innocents."
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/ Flora and Fauna

The Mighty Mouse

I had to laugh when I read an article in in the Washington Post, "D.C.'s mighty mouse is almost impossible to kick out of office." At home you can do what you like about mice, but in the office "there are widely different views on food handling and cleanliness, and then a lot of finger pointing when the rodents come sniffing for crumbs. Further, staffers who are terrified of mice often clash with those who want to protect them."
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/ Flora and Fauna