Topics

Nutrition

Wise Traditions 2017

The 18th annual Wise Traditions conference of the Weston A. Price Foundation is coming up next month, November 10-13 in Minneapolis Minnesota. If you are looking to learn a lot in the company of a community of like-minded individuals, this is the place to be.
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/ Nutrition

Pancake Batter

One of the most versatile and successful recipes from Nourishing Traditions is the pancakes. Freshly ground flour (spelt, emmer or soft winter wheat) soaked overnight with equal parts of yogurt or kefir serves as the base for delicious, light tasting and highly digestible pancakes.
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/ Nutrition, Traditional Foods

Gizzards, The Gateway Organ Meat

Have you ever wondered how animals without teeth chew up their food, especially hard foods like grains? They actually have an internal grinding apparatus, called the gizzard.
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/ Nutrition

Milk and Water Kefir

Kefir grains are a wonderful way to culture raw milk because they are not temperature sensitive—for yogurt and other cultures, the milk needs to be heated and kept warm for the culture to work.
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/ Nutrition

Find Real Food App, Part II

In my last blog, I introduced the Weston A. Price Foundation’s Find Real Food app, the online version of our Shopping Guide. The Shopping Guide and App are unique in many ways.
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/ Nutrition

Find Real Food: The Ultimate Healthy Food Grocery Shopping Guide

Many years ago, a member of the Weston A. Price Foundation named David Morris, came to us with the idea of a shopping guide, which would only list foods that met our Wise Traditions guidelines. He even went out and found the funding for us to print the first issue—that was in 2003.
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/ Nutrition

State of Illinois Still Poisoning Male Prisoners with Soy Diet

Early in 2005, we received a telephone call at the Weston A. Price Foundation office from an Illinois prisoner, Larry “Rocky” Harris. Mr. Harris had a tough, desperate-sounding voice, and something told me I needed to listen carefully. Larry is a “prison lawyer” who helps fellow prisoners write grievances and complaints and advises them as to their legal rights.
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Bringing Up Baby, Part IV

“Food before one is just for fun.” That’s the philosophy for feeding programs that place a few raw vegetables on your baby’s high chair tray; other groups do stress the important nutritional requirements for babies and toddlers, but follow this with recommendations to feed rice cereal and pureed vegetables. Dear parents, your growing baby needs much more than vegetable slices or rice cereal!
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/ Nutrition

Bringing Up Baby, Part III – Baby-Led Weaning??

Recently I visited Whole Foods in Washington, DC and went upstairs to the cafe area to eat my lunch (cheese and homemade pate) before shopping. A woman with a baby of about eight months old came in and sat at the table next to mine. She ate a meal she had purchased at the deli. But what did baby in her high chair get? A few pieces of green pepper and cucumber on the high chair tray. When she left, those vegetable slices were scattered on the floor, with no evidence that baby had eaten much of anything.
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/ Nutrition

Bringing Up Baby, Part II

In my last blog I began a discussion of infant feeding practices, addressing the question of when to begin solid food. In this instance, my views are in accord with those of conventional organizations, namely that for the majority of babies, four to six months is the right age for beginning foods other than breast milk or formula (that’s homemade baby formula, based on raw milk). As for what to feed baby, here I am mostly in disagreement with conventional advice.
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/ Nutrition

Traditional Foods

Pancake Batter

One of the most versatile and successful recipes from Nourishing Traditions is the pancakes. Freshly ground flour (spelt, emmer or soft winter wheat) soaked overnight with equal parts of yogurt or kefir serves as the base for delicious, light tasting and highly digestible pancakes.
Read More
/ Nutrition, Traditional Foods

True Blue Zones: Loma Linda

So far we have looked at four “blue zones,” regions that have lots of long-lived people: Sardinia, Okinawa, Costa Rica and Ikaria. What have we learned so far about the characteristics of these nonagenarians? Maybe the most important thing is to live in a place that ends with the letter A. Just kidding.
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/ Traditional Foods

True Blue Zones: Ikaria, Greece

Tourism in the Greek island of Ikaria got a big boost when scientists determined that Ikaria was a blue zone—an area with a large number of long-lived inhabitants
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/ Traditional Foods

True Blue Zones: Costa Rica

The Nicoya Peninsula is a fertile rectangle of land on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Since the arrival of the Spaniards, the region has hosted herds of beef and dairy cattle. Many tropical fruits thrive there, including citrus, mango and papaya.
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/ Traditional Foods

True Blue Zones: Okinawa

In my last blog, we began a discussion of blue zones—regions with a lot of centenarians—as popularized by Dan Buettner in his book The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who’ve Lived the Longest. As we saw in his chapter on the Sardinian blue zone, he leaves out considerable information that contradicts his premise, namely that the longevity diet is one that contains a lot of vegetables and only small amounts of meat—that’s lean meat, not “processed meats that are filled with fat.”
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/ Traditional Foods

True Blue Zones: Sardinia

Often when I present information on the work of Weston Price, I get feedback that goes like this: native peoples on their native diets, high in animal foods and animal fat, may have been attractive and healthy when they were young, but they did not live into old age. If you want to live a long life, you need to eat a diet that is low in fat, low in salt, high in plant foods and rich in dietary fiber, in short, the penalty for a long life is adherence to the sad and unsatisfying diet foisted on us by the Diet Dictocrats.
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/ Traditional Foods

Update on Bone Broth

"Broth is the new juice," is the saying on the street. Indeed, interest in genuine bone broth is taking off, thanks not only to my book Nourishing Broth, but also to several other great books on the subject. And the number of artisan companies making broth is growing, as a quick look at the Weston A. Price Foundation Shopping Guide will show.
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Nourishing Fats: Why We Need Animal Fats For Health And Happiness

I’m happy to report that my new book, Nourishing Fats, will be out this coming January (2017). The book began as a few notes and a hasty table of contents jotted down over a dozen years ago, after many conversations with my mentor, Mary G. Enig, PhD. We agreed on the need for a popular book addressing the subject of saturated fats, one that would do more than acknowledge the notion that they “might not be so bad,” but explain why they are essential to life. Needless to say, the inspiration for this book, and the basic knowledge on fats and oils, came from her. Nourishing Fats is dedicated to the memory of this courageous biochemist, who sacrificed research grants and a prestigious career in order to warn the public about the dangers of trans fats.
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Kombucha Like Fine Champagne

Kombucha is an artisan product, and like all hand-crafted foods, the best results require patience and time. A good hand-brewed kombucha is like a fine champagne, fizzy with tiny bubbles, a delightful combination of sweet and sour, and even slightly viscous on the tongue.
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/ Traditional Foods

Sorghum

Last September, while driving home to our farm in Southern Maryland after a day at the WAPF office, I came over the crest of the highway to a beautiful sight: sorghum!
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/ Traditional Foods

The Displacing Foods of Modern Commerce

Update on Bone Broth

"Broth is the new juice," is the saying on the street. Indeed, interest in genuine bone broth is taking off, thanks not only to my book Nourishing Broth, but also to several other great books on the subject. And the number of artisan companies making broth is growing, as a quick look at the Weston A. Price Foundation Shopping Guide will show.
Read More

State of Illinois Still Poisoning Male Prisoners with Soy Diet

Early in 2005, we received a telephone call at the Weston A. Price Foundation office from an Illinois prisoner, Larry “Rocky” Harris. Mr. Harris had a tough, desperate-sounding voice, and something told me I needed to listen carefully. Larry is a “prison lawyer” who helps fellow prisoners write grievances and complaints and advises them as to their legal rights.
Read More

Nourishing Fats: Why We Need Animal Fats For Health And Happiness

I’m happy to report that my new book, Nourishing Fats, will be out this coming January (2017). The book began as a few notes and a hasty table of contents jotted down over a dozen years ago, after many conversations with my mentor, Mary G. Enig, PhD. We agreed on the need for a popular book addressing the subject of saturated fats, one that would do more than acknowledge the notion that they “might not be so bad,” but explain why they are essential to life. Needless to say, the inspiration for this book, and the basic knowledge on fats and oils, came from her. Nourishing Fats is dedicated to the memory of this courageous biochemist, who sacrificed research grants and a prestigious career in order to warn the public about the dangers of trans fats.
Read More

Update on “Energy Bars”?

In 2003, Mary Enig and I wrote an article on "energy" bars in which we called out all the so-called "natural" ingredients in these so-called healthy bars—which are actually candy bars made with waste products. Here's what was available at the time—13 years ago:
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A Campaign for Real Milk

Milk Prices and the Decline of Rural Life

Friday April 1 was my husband’s ninetieth birthday, and among the many cards he received was one from our insurance agent, "In the year you were born. . ., " containing a chart of prices now and then.
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/ A Campaign for Real Milk

Flora and Fauna

How Do Animals Feel About Being Killed for Meat?

One of the arguments for vegetarianism holds that killing animals for meat is just like killing human beings—that killing animals is "murder of the innocents."
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/ Flora and Fauna

The Mighty Mouse

I had to laugh when I read an article in in the Washington Post, "D.C.'s mighty mouse is almost impossible to kick out of office." At home you can do what you like about mice, but in the office "there are widely different views on food handling and cleanliness, and then a lot of finger pointing when the rodents come sniffing for crumbs. Further, staffers who are terrified of mice often clash with those who want to protect them."
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/ Flora and Fauna